Boost Wi-Fi Reception

Moderators: RokuDouglas, RokuShawnS, RokuRyan, RokuJamesL, RokuKen

Boost Wi-Fi Reception

Postby briancbray » Mon Dec 27, 2010 7:45 am

I live in an older home with thicker walls, so the wi-fi strength isn't the strongest in some rooms in my house. Has anybody tried anything to boost the wi-fi in their homes to improve the reception for their Roku? I was looking at wi-fi antennas, but they all seem designed to connect with a USB port in a computer (which I don't think would work with the Roku). So what does other people use to increase the reception on their Roku?
briancbray
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon Dec 27, 2010 7:39 am

Re: Boost Wi-Fi Reception

Postby scyber » Mon Dec 27, 2010 8:16 am

There is not much you can do to the roku for better reception. You maybe able to replace the antenna on your router though. It depends on your router. A higher gain antenna and/or a directional antenna may improve your signal at the roku.


However, there is no guarantee. Your best bet woud be to run ethernet from the router to the roku. If you are any bit handy it should be pretty easy to do.
scyber
 
Posts: 1281
Joined: Mon Dec 29, 2008 8:51 am

Re: Boost Wi-Fi Reception

Postby jcmolet » Mon Dec 27, 2010 9:36 am

Powerline adapters may be an option for you if your wi-fi reception is not satisfactory. I have had good luck with the Netgear Powerline AV 200 Adapter Kit -- http://www.amazon.com/NETGEAR-Powerline ... B0036R9YA6 -- using it with my Samsung BD-player. In addition to powerline adapters, there are also MOCA Coax adapters which I have also used in the past. In short, you utilize existing wiring (electrical or coaxial) to make a network connection. You plug the first adapter into an electrical outlet (or coax connection for a MOCA adapter) near your router. You then make an Ethernet cable connection between the adaper and your router. On the other end, you plug a second adapter into an electrical outlet (or coax connection for a MOCA adapter) near your device. Similar to other side, you then run an Ethernet cable between the adapter and the device of choice. You set the device up for a 'wired' connection as from its perspective, it is plugged directly into the router.

http://www.netgear.com/products/home/po ... fault.aspx

Image
jcmolet
 
Posts: 2154
Joined: Sun Nov 15, 2009 3:11 pm
Location: Sierra Vista, AZ

Re: Boost Wi-Fi Reception

Postby jambandit7 » Mon Dec 27, 2010 9:59 am

If you have another router laying around it is possible to program it as a repeater. I have done this at my older brothers house. He had a second player he wanted in his shop behind his house. Tried connecting it to the router in his house first and the signal was very poor. The distance to cover was approximately 90 ft. Used a netgear wgr614v10 as the base and used a netgear wgr614v9 as the repeater. Works fantastic, and he now enjoys excellent signal strength at the roku next to the repeater...
Even if you're on the right track, you'll get run over if you just sit there. - Will Rogers
Roku2 XD- 3050X/HDMI/Composite Audio
Roku XD-Composite A/V
Roku XD-HDMI
jambandit7
 
Posts: 222
Joined: Mon Oct 18, 2010 5:09 am
Location: North Carolina

Re: Boost Wi-Fi Reception

Postby stratcat96 » Mon Dec 27, 2010 10:06 am

The OP hasn't stated what type of wireless router it is... Wireless G/N? If you are using a g, possibly an upgrade to an extended rage N router is all you need..
stratcat96
** Valued Community Member **
 
Posts: 3427
Joined: Sat Nov 06, 2010 7:22 pm
Location: Ice Planet Hoth

Re: Boost Wi-Fi Reception

Postby briancbray » Mon Dec 27, 2010 10:16 am

stratcat96 wrote:The OP hasn't stated what type of wireless router it is... Wireless G/N? If you are using a g, possibly an upgrade to an extended rage N router is all you need..


I have a D-Link DIR-655 Extreme N Gigabit Wireless Router...so it's pretty modern.
briancbray
 
Posts: 2
Joined: Mon Dec 27, 2010 7:39 am

Re: Boost Wi-Fi Reception

Postby scyber » Mon Dec 27, 2010 11:28 am

I had forgotten about powerline networking. That is also an option. Moca is also another possibility. Both use existing cabling for network connectivity.
scyber
 
Posts: 1281
Joined: Mon Dec 29, 2008 8:51 am

Re: Boost Wi-Fi Reception

Postby JimDandySTX » Tue Jan 31, 2012 4:56 am

I use Ethernet over powerline to stream my Slingbox back to my wireless AP. Unfortunately most new Roku models don't have an Ethernet port.

The easiest solution is to purchase a wireless range extender. It will work out of the box with only a few simple options to set up. Available for both G & N networks.

Another solution is to use a wireless router/ AP and set it up as a repeater bridge. If you can live with using G you can flash an old router with DD-WRT and then set it up. (IMHO I get stronger signals using G vs N ).

If you look on e-Bay you can find Linksys 54G routers flashed with DD-WRT for $30 - $50. I set a 54G up last week and it does take some time and experimentation even with good instructions. I had to change settings on both my primary router, access point and repeater bridge. If you aren't experienced tweaking router setting this probably isn't going to be a good option for you.
JimDandySTX
 
Posts: 198
Joined: Sun Jul 10, 2011 3:21 pm

Re: Boost Wi-Fi Reception

Postby Crow550 » Tue Jan 31, 2012 6:54 am

JimDandySTX wrote:I use Ethernet over powerline to stream my Slingbox back to my wireless AP. Unfortunately most new Roku models don't have an Ethernet port.

The easiest solution is to purchase a wireless range extender. It will work out of the box with only a few simple options to set up. Available for both G & N networks.

Another solution is to use a wireless router/ AP and set it up as a repeater bridge. If you can live with using G you can flash an old router with DD-WRT and then set it up. (IMHO I get stronger signals using G vs N ).

If you look on e-Bay you can find Linksys 54G routers flashed with DD-WRT for $30 - $50. I set a 54G up last week and it does take some time and experimentation even with good instructions. I had to change settings on both my primary router, access point and repeater bridge. If you aren't experienced tweaking router setting this probably isn't going to be a good option for you.


Roku still makes boxes with Ethernet. Hopefully will continue to do so too.

If you check second hand stores it's easy to find Linksys 54G routers. I have a pile of them that I might get rid of now that I wired my House. Anyways you need to find Linksys 54Gs that are hackable: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linksys_WR ... _revisions and power plugs: http://www.monoprice.com/products/produ ... 1&format=2

Usually DD-WRT or Tomato (many community supported versions: http://linksysinfo.org/index.php?forums ... rmware.33/ ) is the way to go.

Also going to like a Dollar Store and picking up poster paper, glue stick & foil will allow you to make Wifi boosters that work really well: http://youtu.be/sUTT8wdN_VA

Also once hacked raise transmit power to 70mw: http://lifehacker.com/344765/turn-your- ... ith-tomato

Monoprices routers also offer a good number of features too: http://www.monoprice.com/products/subde ... 21#1052102

However if you can wired will always be more reliable than wireless which is convenient.
Crow550
** Valued Community Member **
 
Posts: 1915
Joined: Sat Dec 13, 2008 11:36 am

Re: Boost Wi-Fi Reception

Postby dgrace » Wed Feb 01, 2012 9:16 am

briancbray wrote:
stratcat96 wrote:The OP hasn't stated what type of wireless router it is... Wireless G/N? If you are using a g, possibly an upgrade to an extended rage N router is all you need..


I have a D-Link DIR-655 Extreme N Gigabit Wireless Router...so it's pretty modern.

I have the same router and find that it has many more configurable features than my Linksys 54G did. May want to post some of the settings and see if someone can suggest changes. If your Roku is a newer one ('N' wifi) and you have no other older 'G' only devices you could try putting the router into 'N Only". Also, being aware of the direct line the signal takes from router to roku may help you find the obstacle. Simply trying to push wifi through a wall mirror (has a metallic film on backside) can really kill the signal strength. Also the orientation of the routers three antennas. When picturing the signal path from router to roku, image the signal coming and going directly from the side of the antennas. The signal radiates outward from these, so slightly tilting may help.
Also, the dir 655 has a power setting as well, so in your case it may need to be on the strongest.
"I might be moving to Montana soon..."
Frank Zappa
dgrace
 
Posts: 280
Joined: Sat Jan 01, 2011 2:31 pm
Location: Montana

Re: Boost Wi-Fi Reception

Postby JimDandySTX » Wed Feb 01, 2012 12:54 pm

The features and settings a router/AP has depend more on the firmware flashed to the router than the hardware itself. If you flash a 54G with DD-WRT or Tomato it will have a huge amount of additional functionality. What it will be lacking is the N band. I currently run two APs and I can't see any increase in range or coverage using N.
JimDandySTX
 
Posts: 198
Joined: Sun Jul 10, 2011 3:21 pm

Re: Boost Wi-Fi Reception

Postby robertm » Wed Feb 01, 2012 1:32 pm

My experience it the same as Jim's. I have two independent G WAPs and I get crazy range. I have a new N one that I recently unplugged because its range was so limited.
robertm
 
Posts: 2640
Joined: Mon Oct 26, 2009 3:06 pm

Re: Boost Wi-Fi Reception

Postby mastermesh » Wed Feb 01, 2012 2:10 pm

http://forums.roku.com/viewtopic.php?f=28&t=46566&p=359897#p359897 -channel lists/tools
http://forums.roku.com/viewtopic.php?f=28&t=63553&p=409506#p409506 -fta
http://forums.roku.com/viewtopic.php?f=28&t=64096 -linear channels
mastermesh
 
Posts: 505
Joined: Tue Jun 21, 2011 5:54 am

Re: Boost Wi-Fi Reception

Postby dgrace » Thu Feb 02, 2012 9:02 am

JimDandySTX wrote:The features and settings a router/AP has depend more on the firmware flashed to the router than the hardware itself. If you flash a 54G with DD-WRT or Tomato it will have a huge amount of additional functionality. What it will be lacking is the N band. I currently run two APs and I can't see any increase in range or coverage using N.

The OP doesn't say which model Roku he's using. If, like me, it's the older model, then the 'G' transmission is all he'll get/use. Thus the jacking up of signal via power settings and antenna placement. If its the newer model with 'N', then I can't say.
"I might be moving to Montana soon..."
Frank Zappa
dgrace
 
Posts: 280
Joined: Sat Jan 01, 2011 2:31 pm
Location: Montana

Re: Boost Wi-Fi Reception

Postby StellarRat » Thu Feb 02, 2012 3:52 pm

There are MANY antenne available on Amazon that are meant to replace the antenna(e) on your router or PC (search on "wi fi antenna"). Look at a "corner reflector" or indoor/outdoor antenna for your router. Also, careful placement of your router and/or antenna(e) can make all the difference. If you decide to get a directional antenna for your router or PCs bear in mind that you'll have to aim the antenna in direction of the router or the routers new antenna in the direction of the PC. Usually, you will have a vastly more powerful signal in about a 45 degree arc from the antenna and nearly nothing to the sides and back. Also, most of the antenne are designed for 2.4 gigahertz signals. Check you router specs to see if it is using 5.0 gigahertz dual band, if it is you might be wasting your money.
StellarRat
 
Posts: 129
Joined: Tue Jan 04, 2011 3:34 pm

Next

Return to Roku Streaming Player General Discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 10 guests