Your Digital Media Has Never Looked So Good

 
barrygordon
Posts: 275
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Location: Merritt Island FL
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Fri Oct 14, 2005 11:52 am

I just got my HD1000 back after being repaired for a non functioning power supply. I plugged in all the cables, put in my flash card (my swap file is there) and powered up. All came up perfectly.

What I appreciated most was that all the mods I made to RC. local, and all the software and config parameters were as I left them when the unit failed and was shipped back to Roku.

Some mfg's would have reloaded a fresh copy of their current softaware. I am glad Roku did not do that!!!

Took me 3 minutes to be up and running.
 
olllllo
Posts: 26
Joined: Fri Nov 05, 2004 3:23 pm
Location: Phoenix, AZ

Mon Oct 31, 2005 11:19 am

 
fretwater
Posts: 1
Joined: Fri Nov 04, 2005 2:12 pm

Fri Nov 04, 2005 2:21 pm

Add me to the failed PS list!! I bought mine in March 2004 and it lasted about 18 months. I just bought a Flashcard to increase the swap space and it was not locking up on me anymore and now it is a paperweight. Unacceptable if you ask me - but I love the product.

I have tinkered a little with electronics before and I might go with the fix posted by olllllo. It would be nice if someone could post instructions with pictures for the DIY PS fix.
 
barrygordon
Posts: 275
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Location: Merritt Island FL
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Fri Nov 04, 2005 4:01 pm

Let me see if I can help you a little bit. I opened my Roku before I sent it back and looked at it. What I am saying is from memory and it is what I will do if the PSU fails again (I think).

Mechanical: There is plenty of room in the case. With the case open and the front nearest you, The power supply is on the left of the MB and connected to it with a 6 conductor cable. Removing the PSU involves removing the screws that hold the PSU to the bottom of the case (I think there are 4 or 6) and unplugging the PS cable from the MB. Easy, no risk. JUST BE SURE YOU HAVE REMOVED THE AC CORD FROM THE BACK OF THE UNIT. The connector to the MB may have a release catch. It is obvious.

Power Supplies and DC-DC converters: A typical ATX PC Power supply supplies multiple voltages, are big and bulky, start with AC and do the whole job. A DC-DC-converter takes in a DC voltage, lets say 12V, and produces several DC voltages. The one found by olllllo seems to be the right size and produces the right voltages at what appears to be the right or at least reasonable power levels. To use it we must be able to secure it to the inside of the case (Screws, Double Sided foam tape, etc). Just make sure that there is no contact between any exposed solder points on the bottom of the converter and the metal case. I like the two sided foam tape that comes in small sheets, 1" wide rolls or mini squares. It is often used to keeep pictures straight on a wall (at least at my house).

An ATX power supply has a "Power Supply ON" logic point. An ATX PS is always on to some degree if fed with input voltage. Pin 14 (green) is the "PS-ON" sense point. Tieing this point to logic ground will turn on the ATX power supply. This does not exist on the original Roku PSU as it is not an ATX PSU

Connecting to the 12V power supply: When you removed the existing PSU you left a nice rectangular hole in the back of the case. Get a small piece of plastic that overlaps the openeing in size. That gives you the wherewithall to drill some holes in the rear of the case around the opening to secure the plastic. Mount on the plastic in the middle so it sits in the opening, a small toggle switch (optional), a panel connector to fit the cable of the 12V (or whatever) brick that supplies the primary voltage. Radio shack has them. Wire the connector in series with the optional switch and wire (soldering probably required) to the DC-DC converter input terminals.

Connecting to the MB: The power cable (as I recall) has 6 wires. 2 Yellow, 1 Red, 3 Black) Wires of the same color are common and went to the same place on the PSU. Black is ground, I believe the red is 5 Volts, and the yellow was 3.3. That makes sense because the 3.3 volt supply has to provide much more power than the 5 volt supply so it needs heavier wire. You can use the old cable as it nicely gives you the correct connector for the MB. Just extend the wires with matching gauge and color (16 gauge should be more than enough) and connect them to the new DC-DC converter output.

Check your work, and before connecting to the MB make sure you have the right voltages at the right points.

The DC-DC converter should run very cool! the heat producing AC-DC part of the PSU is now outside the Roku case. If the DC-DC converter supplies 12V, you could even add a fan on the right side of the MB as there is room there also. Just have to add vent holes so the air has someplace to go if there aren't any. Fan is probably overkill as the major heat producer has just been removed

Hope that helps. This is not a major project nor is it a difficult one for a person with some electro-mechanical skills (ability to solder, drill holes, use tape, follow instructions, locate connection points, etc).

MAJOR DISCALIMER ABSOLVING ME OF ALL BLAME GOES HERE. PROCEED AT YOUR OWN RISK.
Last edited by barrygordon on Fri Nov 11, 2005 10:43 am, edited 1 time in total.
 
olllllo
Posts: 26
Joined: Fri Nov 05, 2004 3:23 pm
Location: Phoenix, AZ

Mon Nov 07, 2005 3:46 pm

Thanks Barry, your write up is better than mine and I actually did it. My hat is off to you!

barrygordon is right on but make sure you double check the voltages and do not rely on the wire colors.
The voltages are marked clearly on the Roku board and the PSU board.

I'm also going off of memory, but I believe there is an orange (3.3v?)
wire that is not accounted for in barry gordon's write-up.

I do have some primative photos, but I won't have a chance to u/l them anywhere until Tues or Weds, as I am on the road.

I used self adhesive plastic wire clips to and one of the original screws to hold the board in place. There is a plastic adhesive film under the original PSU that I left in place as additional insurance that there is no contact between any exposed solder points on the bottom of the converter and the metal case.

Jumping the motherboard on/off control (Pin 14 - Green) or mounting a switch is essential otherwise the power will be off by default.

Strictly speaking you could do all of this without soldering and kludge it together using wire connectors. I did a dry fit before I soldered my connections.
I used the old Roku connector by desoldering it from the original dead power supply, but you could have easily cut the wires.

Just follow Barry's advice.
 
barrygordon
Posts: 275
Joined: Thu Aug 19, 2004 6:33 am
Location: Merritt Island FL
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Mon Nov 07, 2005 4:20 pm

Very Good olllllo. I forgot about the on/off switch (pin 14 of the ATX connector). I suggest just a small mini toggle switch mounted on the back (room on the plastic I suggested) will do just fine. You can then eliminate the series switch on the Input DC voltage line.
 
olllllo
Posts: 26
Joined: Fri Nov 05, 2004 3:23 pm
Location: Phoenix, AZ

Tue Nov 08, 2005 1:01 pm

Here are some primative pictures. Please note that my camera was running out of gas and I was kludging this together for a party I was having later that evening. Right after this I carved Pumpkins. Noticably missing are photos of the actual soldering and fitting of the board to the unit.

Cover off and power supply unmounted.
http://photobucket.com/albums/c345/olllllo/?action=view&current=IMG_9470.jpg
1) Note the brown area on the cover above the power supply. This is actually after I wiped it off.
2) I have also desoldered the leads to power supply. Hard to see here but the 3.3v are orange not red.
3) The disks on the left side are the feet, but as barrygordon noted, there's plenty of room here too.

Hot wired here for test.
http://photobucket.com/albums/c345/olllllo/?action=view&current=IMG_9474.jpg
1) Note that pin 14 is looped back to negative. Later a switch will control this.

Test success.
Note doggy ice cream cone toy in upper left.
http://photobucket.com/albums/c345/olllllo/?action=view&current=IMG_9475.jpg
1) Yes, this is my old Amiga Monitor.

Very had to tell here but...
http://photobucket.com/albums/c345/olllllo/?action=view&current=IMG_9478.jpg
1) Push button switch is mounted on outer right.
2) Moving left is he DC female connector.
3) The big gaping hole that is testament to ... (insert your thoughts here) :evil:
 
Bill123
Posts: 15
Joined: Mon Jan 17, 2005 9:52 am

Fri Nov 11, 2005 10:14 am

olllllo

Thanks for the info and the pictures. The only question I have is about the switch. Is it absolutely necessary? Is it a two position toggle or an instantaneous contact (like a reset button)?

thanks

Bill
 
barrygordon
Posts: 275
Joined: Thu Aug 19, 2004 6:33 am
Location: Merritt Island FL
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Fri Nov 11, 2005 10:37 am

The switch is not necessary, but if you leave it out you must tie pin 14 the "power on" sense lead to ground so the unit will be on. It is a SPST switch, not momentary.
 
Bill123
Posts: 15
Joined: Mon Jan 17, 2005 9:52 am

Fri Nov 11, 2005 2:44 pm

Thanks

With the help of this thread, I got my PB back in working order using a small ATX power supply. Not hard to do. Probably going to get the DC-DC converter referenced earlier in the thread for a more permanent fix.

thanks

Bill
 
barrygordon
Posts: 275
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Fri Nov 11, 2005 3:55 pm

There are only three key lines in the roku. 3.3v (yellow) 7 amps, 5v (Red)1 Amp), Ground (Black).

In an ATX supply there are many more wires to the MB. The following URL shows the ATX pinout http://xtronics.com/reference/atx_pinout.htm

Any connector that can handle 16 Gauge wire, three leads should be enough. Mount the chasis version of the male connector on the back of the Roku (bulkhead mount) and terminate the power supply in the mating connector. This mod takes all of the PSU heat out of the roku, but you then need to hide the ATX PSU.

Voltage is voltage is voltage. If it can source the power (amps), is regulated, and well filtered there should be no problem. Every ATX PSU meets these conditions.
 
olllllo
Posts: 26
Joined: Fri Nov 05, 2004 3:23 pm
Location: Phoenix, AZ

Fri Nov 11, 2005 4:44 pm

The only question I have is about the switch. Is it absolutely necessary? Is it a two position toggle or an instantaneous contact (like a reset button)?


flower, I thought I was going to catch flak from some uber geek about not using the original front mount roku panel switch or mounting some LEDs or perhaps IR integration. :oops:

In this pic (lower left) if you squint at the connector you can see a grey wire looped back. This is pin 14 looped to ground. This would suffice.

http://photobucket.com/albums/c345/olllllo/?action=view&current=IMG_9474.jpg

No switch required, but you are going to have to make the 12V DC Jack Cable (dc female to the pins on the power supply board) anyway, requiring a trip to Radio Shack. Barry is correct about the switch spec.

I hope that some one can take this to the next level. This power supply enables fan power, hard drive power, LCD, etc.

Does the roku support 2 monitors?
 
halfsheep
Posts: 75
Joined: Sun Nov 28, 2004 9:16 pm

Sat Dec 03, 2005 2:11 pm

Sadly, add me to the dead unit list. Born April 04 - Died Dec 2005.

I have plenty of space over my unit - it was not hot at all. It's gotten warm-ish before but never really hot in fact. Also, it's one of the coldest days my house has seen in a while (it's was 64 degrees in the room it died in.) Doesn't seem heat would have been the problem today of all days.

Could anything else kill these? E.g. a power surge? I have a whole house surge protector that is supposed to cover stuff like this.
 
barrygordon
Posts: 275
Joined: Thu Aug 19, 2004 6:33 am
Location: Merritt Island FL
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Sat Dec 03, 2005 5:38 pm

Death by heat build up is a long slow progressive process. It is the culmination of long term degradation of the affected components.

I doubt if it was a surge, or the temperature on its last day
 
halfsheep
Posts: 75
Joined: Sun Nov 28, 2004 9:16 pm

Sat Dec 03, 2005 11:09 pm

Bummer. Thanks Barry.

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