Your Digital Media Has Never Looked So Good

 
jlsoaz
Topic Author
Posts: 586
Joined: Tue Mar 07, 2006 2:12 pm

reading a book on a TV

Mon Jun 25, 2018 3:25 pm

Hi - 

this topic is a placeholder - I had created a similar topic in 2017 which got a little discussion, and then posted a more focused question here a few weeks ago (which got some helpful answers), but it was deleted accidentally as part of some admin work.

So, the question was roughly to get a sense of whether it is useful to pursue reading books on a TV screen.  I think some of the answers were either very negative or skeptical, pointing out that it's just not very practical-seeming.  While I sort of took this point, I still wanted to know what it would be like first-hand.  After all, even for reading on a phone, my eyes are a bit old and I tend to use larger font.  Why not just try this on a TV, even if it uses a font that looks oddly large to others?

I did try one station that cost me a small amount of money (one-time) which was Holy Bible K.J.V.  I'm looking at it now, and is not out of the question as a format.  There are similar issues to what I have on my phone, which is that there is a learning curve to being able to navigate.  I haven't really tried it in-depth though.  I won't claim that it's great, just that at first look I don't immediately dismiss it.
 
Pompey
Posts: 267
Joined: Mon Oct 17, 2011 4:24 pm
Location: New York, NY

Re: reading a book on a TV

Mon Jun 25, 2018 6:50 pm

I started this topic a long, long time ago.....  see  https://forums.roku.com/viewtopic.php?f ... =overdrive

I thought we might be able to enjoy publicly licensed e-books, audio-books, and movies on our Roku's with an Overdrive channel.  In my case, the New York Public Library has tons and tons of audio and video content.
Nothing ever came of it.
If you click through the link to the Overdrive blog, you will see it is broken. I checked WaybackMachine and it looks like it was never scraped and archived.
If you have ever linked a desktop or laptop computer to a really large TV or monitor to display textual material, you will find that the reading experience isn't pretty. That's what we have e-readers, or 8-10" tablets for. I did think that books with graphical content might be great on a TV ..... maybe maps or charts, illustrations, or beautiful photographs on a big screen, to augment a paper book, or an e-book on a tablet ....  especially for my aging eyes.
But i can understand why the general interest was probably nil. 
By the way; if you are interested in free movies (if available from your local library) check out the kanopy channel. It is great. Just make sure you have a valid library card.
"One great use of words is to hide our thoughts." Voltaire
"We are masters of the unsaid words, but slaves of those we let slip out." Winston Churchill
 
jlsoaz
Topic Author
Posts: 586
Joined: Tue Mar 07, 2006 2:12 pm

Re: reading a book on a TV

Mon Jun 25, 2018 9:19 pm

Pompey wrote:
I started this topic a long, long time ago.....  see  https://forums.roku.com/viewtopic.php?f ... =overdrive

I thought we might be able to enjoy publicly licensed e-books, audio-books, and movies on our Roku's with an Overdrive channel.  In my case, the New York Public Library has tons and tons of audio and video content.
Nothing ever came of it.
If you click through the link to the Overdrive blog, you will see it is broken. I checked WaybackMachine and it looks like it was never scraped and archived.
If you have ever linked a desktop or laptop computer to a really large TV or monitor to display textual material, you will find that the reading experience isn't pretty. That's what we have e-readers, or 8-10" tablets for. I did think that books with graphical content might be great on a TV ..... maybe maps or charts, illustrations, or beautiful photographs on a big screen, to augment a paper book, or an e-book on a tablet ....  especially for my aging eyes.
But i can understand why the general interest was probably nil. 
By the way; if you are interested in free movies (if available from your local library) check out the kanopy channel. It is great. Just make sure you have a valid library card.

The audio book side of this idea sounds intriguing.  I can imagine putting on such a book while one does housework.

On the overall idea of it, I'm not sure if I've heard of  overdrive, though Rakuten itself may be familiar (alternative to kindle? or do I have it mixed up with something else).

I don't think the idea of reading a book on Roku is limited to any one effort.  As you say, for now I'm assuming that it's not necessarily a really good way to go, though I remain curious to see if someone starts a channel or two, perhaps with a few free old ebooks.  Looking at this from a trial app point of view, the bible channel that I did buy seems "ok" at first glance, though probably has the drawbacks mentioned, if I really tried to read for more than a minute or two.
 
Pompey
Posts: 267
Joined: Mon Oct 17, 2011 4:24 pm
Location: New York, NY

Re: reading a book on a TV

Mon Jun 25, 2018 10:04 pm

OverDrive is a multimedia app for access to publicly licensed content available at participating libraries. It has been around for a long time. It recently came under the Rakuten umbrella. There is an app for Android, IOS, Windows 10, Windows legacy. You can use it on your PC or your phone or tablet.  Check http://www.overdrive.com. All you need is a valid library card and an online account with your local library.
As for audio-books, when at home I listen to them all the time on my Roku, casting them from my PC either with PlayOn or Roku Media Player, when I want to hear the better sound quality from my AVR and speakers. Plex will let you do that, as well. I listen whether i purchased the audio-books, or borrowed from the library. You could also do this with a Bluetooth enabled AVR, from your phone or tablet.
Try your local library and see if they participate with Overdrive. They might also partner with cloudLibrary or SimplyE. There are plenty of Bibles available electronically for free at a library, from King James to New Catholic. Plenty available at Google Docs, Amazon Kindle, and B & N Nook, too. As for listening, I just searched for Holy Bible audio-books from the NYPL and found 112 hits for various versions.
"One great use of words is to hide our thoughts." Voltaire
"We are masters of the unsaid words, but slaves of those we let slip out." Winston Churchill
 
jlsoaz
Topic Author
Posts: 586
Joined: Tue Mar 07, 2006 2:12 pm

Re: reading a book on a TV

Sat Jun 30, 2018 10:08 am

Pompey wrote:
OverDrive is a multimedia app for access to publicly licensed content available at participating libraries. It has been around for a long time. It recently came under the Rakuten umbrella. There is an app for Android, IOS, Windows 10, Windows legacy. You can use it on your PC or your phone or tablet.  Check http://www.overdrive.com. All you need is a valid library card and an online account with your local library.
As for audio-books, when at home I listen to them all the time on my Roku, casting them from my PC either with PlayOn or Roku Media Player, when I want to hear the better sound quality from my AVR and speakers. Plex will let you do that, as well. I listen whether i purchased the audio-books, or borrowed from the library. You could also do this with a Bluetooth enabled AVR, from your phone or tablet.
Try your local library and see if they participate with Overdrive. They might also partner with cloudLibrary or SimplyE. There are plenty of Bibles available electronically for free at a library, from King James to New Catholic. Plenty available at Google Docs, Amazon Kindle, and B & N Nook, too. As for listening, I just searched for Holy Bible audio-books from the NYPL and found 112 hits for various versions.

Hi - thanks for the points.  On the one hand, there's a wealth of information here for me to digest, and I did go dig up a couple of library cards that I have kept but not used over the last couple of decades.

On the other hand, the main thing I am after here has nothing to do with libraries or saving money.  I just want a very brief experiment to try reading or listening to e-books via Roku.  What I mean by that is: Which Roku channels can I install, hassle-free, to do this and perform the experiment for a few minutes, max?  (It is not a hassle to pay a very small amount, as an experiment). 

I do understand that I may have to meet the situation halfway by seeing about these areas where a bit of hobbyist electronics effort is needed, but first I thought I'd see about solutions that do not involve my laptop, special setups, etc.  This is particularly because in the end I suspect that reading on the screen may not be to my taste for reasons given by others, and underscored somewhat by the one channel I've been able to find that allowed me to read one book.  Still, I must admit, I did not completely hate the one channel I installed (I'll have to go back to it soon and give another try to a few more paragraphs), so I won't count out the whole idea completely, just yet. 

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