Your Digital Media Has Never Looked So Good

 
stratcat96
** Valued Community Member **
Topic Author
Posts: 3432
Joined: Sat Nov 06, 2010 7:22 pm
Location: Ice Planet Hoth
Contact:

RIAA chief: ISPs to start policing copyright by July 12

Thu Mar 15, 2012 5:40 pm

from CNET.com

NEW YORK--The country's largest Internet service providers haven't given up on the idea of becoming copyright cops.
Last July, Comcast, Cablevision, Verizon, Time Warner Cable and other bandwidth providers announced that they had agreed to adopt policies designed to discourage customers from illegally downloading music, movies and software. Since then, the ISPs have been very quiet about their antipiracy measures....


full article here:

http://news.cnet.com/8301-31001_3-57397452-261/riaa-chief-isps-to-start-policing-copyright-by-july-12/

Here's a question-- What could this mean to those of us who use (and produce) private channels for the Roku enabling copyrighted material to be viewed (downloaded) on the TV? What about even using the private YOUTUBE channel to view copyrighted material? Does it apply? Could your isp punish you for using private channels?
 
DaBronx
** Valued Community Member **
Posts: 3231
Joined: Fri Apr 02, 2010 6:50 am
Location: One East 161st Street, Bronx, NY 10451
Contact:

Re: RIAA chief: ISPs to start policing copyright by July 12

Thu Mar 15, 2012 5:49 pm

stratcat96 wrote:
from CNET.com

NEW YORK--The country's largest Internet service providers haven't given up on the idea of becoming copyright cops.
Last July, Comcast, Cablevision, Verizon, Time Warner Cable and other bandwidth providers announced that they had agreed to adopt policies designed to discourage customers from illegally downloading music, movies and software. Since then, the ISPs have been very quiet about their antipiracy measures....


full article here:

http://news.cnet.com/8301-31001_3-57397452-261/riaa-chief-isps-to-start-policing-copyright-by-july-12/

Here's a question-- What could this mean to those of us who use (and produce) private channels for the Roku enabling copyrighted material to be viewed (downloaded) on the TV? What about even using the private YOUTUBE channel to view copyrighted material? Does it apply? Could your isp punish you for using private channels?


What a nanny state Amerika has become.

Going to the museum this weekend to see what freedom used to look like.

Peace

brett
55" Insignia-Roku 4K TV, 40" Hisense Roku TV, Roku2 XS #13A164000326, R3 #1GJ36A038993, R4 wired to Netgear WND 3700 router, 300 mb TWC broadband (Subscriber- 2019 MLB.TV Premium, 2018-19 NHL.TV, Hulu+, Netflix, Amazon Prime)
 
SCOREtv.TV
Posts: 213
Joined: Fri Jan 20, 2012 11:19 am
Location: Miami
Contact:

Re: RIAA chief: ISPs to start policing copyright by July 12

Fri Mar 16, 2012 3:40 pm

stratcat96 wrote:
Here's a question-- What could this mean to those of us who use (and produce) private channels for the Roku enabling copyrighted material to be viewed (downloaded) on the TV? What about even using the private YOUTUBE channel to view copyrighted material? Does it apply? Could your isp punish you for using private channels?


My only thought here is that they are going after the consumer, instead of the the infringing website.
Private channel : SCORETV https://owner.roku.com/Add/SCORETV
 
SCOREtv.TV
Posts: 213
Joined: Fri Jan 20, 2012 11:19 am
Location: Miami
Contact:

Re: RIAA chief: ISPs to start policing copyright by July 12

Fri Mar 16, 2012 3:50 pm

If you were in India it would be worst, they implemented their version of SOPA.

http://arstechnica.com/tech-policy/news ... bsites.ars

The recent Stop Online Piracy Act (SOPA), considered and eventually abandoned by the US Congress after rancorous debate earlier this year, proposed giving judges the power to cut off American access to particular websites. Under the initial version of the bill, judges would have been able order Internet service providers to use only crude tools like DNS blocking to make piratical websites harder to access. The proposal was criticized strongly on grounds of practicality, due process, and free speech, but major rightsholders want such approaches implemented worldwide. In India, they have succeeded.


As for how the blocks will be implemented, the court has allowed Internet providers three options: blocking by DNS name ("arstechnica.com"), blocking by IP address ("75.102.3.15"), or URL blocking by deep packet inspection (which can do things like block specific links like "arstechnica.com/bollywood").
Private channel : SCORETV https://owner.roku.com/Add/SCORETV
 
SCOREtv.TV
Posts: 213
Joined: Fri Jan 20, 2012 11:19 am
Location: Miami
Contact:

Re: RIAA chief: ISPs to start policing copyright by July 12

Thu Apr 05, 2012 8:32 am

The Electronic Frontier has a response to the RIAA

https://action.eff.org/o/9042/p/dia/act ... n_KEY=8547

If you are against this move by the ISPs you can leave the text as is, but if you are for it you can change the text to be in favor of what they are now calling the "six strikes" rule.

The position of the EFF is to content providers/developers that if you make the content, you do the worrying about payroll, agreements, production, etc. Then, someone who steals your work should not be prosecuted, should not be sued, and NOW shouldn't even have their internet access threatened.

The EFF is going to use this drive to show massive protests against Six Strikes. I don't see anything wrong with Time Warner (who makes movies too) saying "if we catch you stealing SIX TIMES, we just might slow down your internet connection for a while."
Private channel : SCORETV https://owner.roku.com/Add/SCORETV
 
mkiker2089
Posts: 2810
Joined: Fri Jul 03, 2009 9:03 pm

Re: RIAA chief: ISPs to start policing copyright by July 12

Thu Apr 05, 2012 10:37 am

I don't think the EFF wants piracy. They just don't want net nanny forced on us either.

The problem isn't as much with piracy as it is with the way the studios went about fighting it. We all know the story of the pre-teen girl who was randomly selected and and billed something like 20,000 dollars for copyright infringement.

Pirates would not have purchased the content anyway, that's the first fallacy that the studios need to lose in order to gain credibility. The person who downloads the content is a problem yes, but it's the one who SHARES it that needs to be sued.

If I download a song you don't know if I will buy it or even already own it. I've downloaded songs I own because often it's easier that ripping them myself. What if I download a song, like it and buy the album? Did I pirate? What if I don't like it so don't buy it? Am I pirate because I didn't like even if I would have bought it had I? If TW sees me downloading their music and comes after me they better be flower sure I don't own the CD or else the EFF and other legal activists will have ammunition against them. Fair use doctrine still allows a digital copy of any media and the way I get it is none of their business.

I'm not sure about the stealing term either. I'm not sure it applies and I know that usually it isn't used in a courtroom for such cases. Theft means you took something either physical or intellectual. You didn't take the only copy of the movie or the rights to it. It also implies, as I said before, that the pirate would have paid for the content had they not "stole" it which is usually (not always) wrong. They lose sympathy when they talk about "stealing" and it turns out the "theif" was a little boy who wanted background music for a skateboarding video on youtube.

I'm not soft on pirates even though it may sound like I am. I just think going to extremes like the MPAA and RIAA like to will hurt them. Look at SOPA for a perfect example. A law that would have included taking the site owners to court and had full due process in front of a jury would have been fine. They didn't want that however and insisted on an internet "off" button that they could have pressed until the site owner proved he wasn't guilty. The complete reverse of a fair judicial system. In the end they ended up losing it all because they are, quite frankly, idiots when it comes to understanding their customers.
-Marshall-

Nun sacciu, nun vidi, nun ceru e si ceru durmiv.
I know nothing, I see nothing, I wasn't there,
and if I was there, I was asleep.
 
SCOREtv.TV
Posts: 213
Joined: Fri Jan 20, 2012 11:19 am
Location: Miami
Contact:

Re: RIAA chief: ISPs to start policing copyright by July 12

Thu Apr 05, 2012 11:57 am

mkiker2089 wrote:
Pirates would not have purchased the content anyway, that's the first fallacy that the studios need to lose in order to gain credibility. The person who downloads the content is a problem yes, but it's the one who SHARES it that needs to be sued.


Great statement.

What I consider a Pirate are companies that profit from the theft, not the consumer who is being used as a pawn to be pillaged by the Pirates and the Studios in this case the RIAA/MPAA.
Private channel : SCORETV https://owner.roku.com/Add/SCORETV
 
mkiker2089
Posts: 2810
Joined: Fri Jul 03, 2009 9:03 pm

Re: RIAA chief: ISPs to start policing copyright by July 12

Thu Apr 05, 2012 2:55 pm

I'm not in the know anymore but I used to be and the general rule was that the MPAA itself was the leak. Movies were often leaked when submitted for ratings. I'm sure they've worked hard to purge that. I know some of the movies were even tagged as such.

I imagine we can all agree that going after the source of the pirated product is the issue especially when it comes to movies and games that aren't even released yet.

Remember when the Academy warned everyone very publicly that the award screeners were going to have hidden tags and one got out to the public and traced back to a b-lister. Can't remember the name. I've always suspected that was a set up to bring awareness to piracy but who knows.
-Marshall-

Nun sacciu, nun vidi, nun ceru e si ceru durmiv.
I know nothing, I see nothing, I wasn't there,
and if I was there, I was asleep.
 
stratcat96
** Valued Community Member **
Topic Author
Posts: 3432
Joined: Sat Nov 06, 2010 7:22 pm
Location: Ice Planet Hoth
Contact:

Re: RIAA chief: ISPs to start policing copyright by July 12

Thu Apr 05, 2012 3:25 pm

way back in 1982, Jack Valenti of the MPAA said to Congress of the VCR, "I say to you that the VCR is to the American film producer and the American public as the Boston strangler is to the woman home alone." Contrary to his prediction, home video sales (and obvously rentals) became a mainstay of revenue throughout the 80's and 90's. They even ended up getting a cut of blank media sales too to offset "piracy" damages.

Rather than fighting new technology and ways to consume the media and trying to stamp it out, they should embrace it. Make their product available to people to consume how they choose for a fair price. Instead of that they want ISPs to spy on people because they couldn't get Congress to make it happen for them. These upcoming actions of the ISPs, and now with the new proposed CISPA act in Congress set a very dangerous precedent for just how far corporations and government can pry into your life to try and catch you doing something wrong. It's becoming more and more the mentality that all people are guilty but they just haven't caught us yet...
 
User avatar
crassh76
Posts: 612
Joined: Sun Jun 06, 2010 12:27 pm
Location: Port Saint Lucie, Florida 34987

Re: RIAA chief: ISPs to start policing copyright by July 12

Thu Apr 05, 2012 7:16 pm

stratcat96 wrote:
way back in 1982, Jack Valenti of the MPAA said to Congress of the VCR, "I say to you that the VCR is to the American film producer and the American public as the Boston strangler is to the woman home alone." Contrary to his prediction, home video sales (and obvously rentals) became a mainstay of revenue throughout the 80's and 90's. They even ended up getting a cut of blank media sales too to offset "piracy" damages.

Rather than fighting new technology and ways to consume the media and trying to stamp it out, they should embrace it. Make their product available to people to consume how they choose for a fair price. Instead of that they want ISPs to spy on people because they couldn't get Congress to make it happen for them. These upcoming actions of the ISPs, and now with the new proposed CISPA act in Congress set a very dangerous precedent for just how far corporations and government can pry into your life to try and catch you doing something wrong. It's becoming more and more the mentality that all people are guilty but they just haven't caught us yet...

Very well said. 8)
Roku Premiere
Roku Stick
and a bunch of original Rokus
Wifi 35 Mbps
Plume Pods
Philips 47" LCD 1080P
Roku to TV by HDMI for A/V
Eastern Time Zone (Florida zip code 34987)
 
dwanthny
Posts: 787
Joined: Sat Jan 14, 2012 7:41 pm
Location: North Carolina, USA

Re: RIAA chief: ISPs to start policing copyright by July 12

Thu Apr 26, 2012 8:44 am

Take 5 minutes and watch Rob Reid's Ted Talk video "The $8 billion iPod" where he explains "Copyright Math" to the general public. Very funny.
Comic author Rob Reid unveils Copyright Math (TM), a remarkable new field of study based on actual numbers from entertainment industry lawyers and lobbyists.

Rob Reid is a humor author and the founder of the company that created the music subscription service Rhapsody.
 
wzwor
Posts: 807
Joined: Wed Jun 27, 2012 5:47 am
Contact:

Re: RIAA chief: ISPs to start policing copyright by July 12

Tue Jan 29, 2013 8:18 am

Best response is to not patronize the offenders. If you want to watch a DVD, borrow it from a library or friend. If you want to listen to a cd or an audio book, borrow it from a library or friend. Cancel your cable, satellite, or FIoS and put up an antenna. One summer of this will make MPAA and RIAA more receptive to reasonable licensing agreements.
http://thebeersoncomcast.wordpress.com/

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests