Your Digital Media Has Never Looked So Good

 
sam.thorpe
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What's the best DVD to MPeg software?

Mon Jan 03, 2005 12:14 am

What are people using to convert their DVD's to MPEGs? So far my result is pretty grainy and with 2ch audio. Is it possible to retain the 5.1 audio when converting to an mpeg?

Who's getting good results? Can you point me in the direction of a super app?

Thanks.
Sam Thorpe
 
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TheEndless
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Mon Jan 03, 2005 12:42 am

 
HookedOnTV
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Mon Jan 03, 2005 9:02 am

Why would you do any conversion? If you want to use the built-in Roku player just rename the file extension from .vob to .mpg. Better yet use a 3rd party app like MPlay and leave the extension .vob. No need for any conversion.
- Travis
 
sam.thorpe
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Problems ripping entire movie

Mon Jan 03, 2005 9:42 am

Thanks for the assistance. Getting pointed to DVD Shrink was just what I needed.

But, intersting issue here...when do a brief rip test (primarily to test quality) and rename the .vob file extension to an .mpg file, everything works well. The Roku plays the test in brilliant quality and 5.1 surround.

However, when I rip the entire movie, beyond just a test, (using DVD Shrink) and then put it into my share folder, the Roku claims to be unable to read the movie. The Roku cannot read the resulting .mpgs, although Windows Media player has no problem, so it seems like the files are not corrupt.

Has anyone else noticed this? I'm simply renaming the largest .vob file created by DVD shrink. Do I need to include another file along with the primary .mpg? Is there a setting I may have missed. I've got 3 movies that I've ripped in their entirety have gotten the same results. Again, all short tests work great.

Help?
Sam Thorpe
 
rodhew
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Mon Jan 03, 2005 10:55 am

I've seen the same thing. I've got some 7 GB+ movies as .mpg files and sometimes they just don't play. Rebooting seems to fix though.

Rod
 
sam.thorpe
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Joined: Mon Jan 03, 2005 12:11 am

Perfect, Thanks!

Mon Jan 03, 2005 11:11 am

A reboot did the trick, Thanks! I didn't think of that initially, because the files wouldn't play coming out of a reboot...but another reboot fixed the issue!

Thanks.

Sam
Sam Thorpe
 
Bgrubb1
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File length

Mon Jan 03, 2005 12:36 pm

So am I not the only one having problems with long files ???
Long files seem to cause an issue for me where if I try to play a long file after playing a few, the files will not open (unable to play under built in player, file open error under mplay) files less than 2 gig continue to work fine. After the error, it may take several reboots or a reload to get things working with long files again. Is this the behavior you are seeing ??
 
sam.thorpe
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Posts: 14
Joined: Mon Jan 03, 2005 12:11 am

File length issues

Mon Jan 03, 2005 12:56 pm

It sounds like my issue was a little different, but I have seen some similar behavior as you describe. Are you using a wireless connection? It may be a contributor to your issues, as I believe it may be to mine. I've never watched several long files to completion (see audio issue outlined below), but I have noticed once I have difficulty with one file, I seem to experience the same issue with each subsequent file I attempt to view.

The issues that I still face:

1) Occasionally, I get a message saying that the Roku cannot play my larger files (3 or 4 gb). This issue seems to be resolved by an occasional reboot. Live-able.

2) Lastly, but most crippling-ly, it seems like the quality of the files I prefer aren't too friendly with my wireless network. Despite having a wireless 802.11 G router with a range extender between the router and the Roku, I lose the audio stream about 2 minutes into a DVD. The picture appears to hang or stutter for a moment and then continues to play sans audio.

I'm not sure if this is a wireless network bandwidth issue or if this is a known issue and something that may be resolved before the public release, but it makes the likelihood of this being a reliable way to enjoy movies very unlikely. Unfortunately, the Roku's location doen't permit me to connect it through a wired ethernet cable to my media server.

Boo-hoo for me.

Anyone having good success with large, long file playback over a wireless connection? If so, are you ripping the DVD with added compression?
Sam Thorpe
 
scuba
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G networks and streaming

Mon Jan 03, 2005 1:03 pm

Hi,

I have a Luinksys WRT54G at home, plus an extender. When I added a D-Link wireless bridge, everything got slow. If I unplug my extender and don't have laptops connected to the wireless G network, it works "ok." Last night I ripped out the wireless bridge and hard wired the HD1000 to the network, turned back on my extender, moved on with life.

If it's possible, I suggest you hard wire it. Lots of things can impact the performance of G.

Just my 2 cents,
Scuba
 
sam.thorpe
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Wireless flower

Mon Jan 03, 2005 1:25 pm

I'm using a wireless ethernet bridge as well. Any idea if I'd see better performace from a usb adapter instead of the bridge?

I agree with the sentiment and wish I could go wired without significant expense.

One of my favorite other Network Appliances for media is the Audiotron from Turtle Beach. It's the best unit-based led interface I've ever seen for handling large mp3 libraries and it has a kick-ass web server for controlling playback from a laptop or pda anywhere in your house. Offers spdif output as well.

Back to topic, ever since I've converted over to wireless network in our most recent house (used to run it wired), I've had numerous issues with the Audiotron. One of the things that really helped was to give it a static IP on the network. This is something I'm considering trying with the Roku as well.

Although, I'm coming to terms with the reality that wireless networks are great for business tasks via a desktop, laptop or pda, but insufficient for serving up media, especially high-bandwidth media. It may seem obvious, but I was hoping that G was going to make it possible.

Bummed out...
Sam Thorpe
 
HookedOnTV
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Mon Jan 03, 2005 1:50 pm

For personal sanity go wired if at all possible. If you have access to an attic or crawl space running cat5 is pretty easy.
- Travis
 
chrisloker
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Mon Jan 03, 2005 2:23 pm

Sometimes just rethinking how you have everything setup can get you hard wired.

I had my cable modem hooked up upstairs with my router upstairs. Roku is in my AV closet downstairs. Kept thinking I had to wirelessly get to the Roku because my router was upstairs hooked to my primary computer and it was going to be a big deal getting wire down to the Roku.

When really - all I had to do was move the cable modem downstairs where I could hard wire to the Roku. Then setup my computer upstairs as the wireless one. Of course if I were to stream from the upstairs computer it wouldn't do much good. So I originally just purchased a Buffalo Linkstation (nice, fairly cheap, and quiet) to act as my media server hard wired also to the router downstairs (I have since added a full computer to be my media server for the Soundbridge).

So I now have hard wired downstairs the HD1000, Soundbridge, my Buffalo Linkstation (120gb for video) and old Celeron computer (120gb for audio). Then my main computer upstairs, my Ipaq, and my wife's laptop all access the network wirelessly (the main computer uses the wireless bridge I originally got for the Roku - but I could just have easily used USB or expansion card)
 
sam.thorpe
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Joined: Mon Jan 03, 2005 12:11 am

Mon Jan 03, 2005 3:48 pm

Nice out-of-the-box thinking. Very clever. The linkstations look great...especially for audio/mp3.

I wish they had a 300gb Linkstation, which would be my size preference for video.

Again, great suggestion.
Sam Thorpe
 
sam.thorpe
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Joined: Mon Jan 03, 2005 12:11 am

Mon Jan 03, 2005 4:59 pm

Ahhh...you've got me thinking now and the answer was right under my nose. I've got the Roku, an Audiotron and an XBox connected to a switch that is then conneced to an ethernet bridge.

I'll connect a Buffalo Linkstation or some other NAS and then it will be wired directly to the Roku, which shouldn't have any problem finding it.

Beauty. Thanks.
Sam Thorpe
 
chrisloker
Posts: 116
Joined: Sat Nov 06, 2004 7:23 am

Tue Jan 04, 2005 4:54 pm

They have a 300GB Linkstation HD-H300LAN. I have the original HD-H120LAN (120GB). But they all also have USB 2.0 ports where you can add any USB drive to increase capacity (or act as an automatic backup drive).

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