Your Digital Media Has Never Looked So Good

 
randyspaulding
Topic Author
Posts: 3
Joined: Mon Sep 12, 2005 10:53 am

High Definition Playback

Mon Sep 12, 2005 6:16 pm

I have a Sony High-Defintion display (16:9) connected to my Roku 1000 (sw 2.0.33). I have a 54Mbs wireless access point plugged into the ethernet port. On my computer I have a WRT54G wireless router. I record High-Definition on my Sony camcorder, download it to my PC and put it in a shared folder. Plays back fine on the PC, but when I try to playback on my Sony High-Def display (via the wireless network connected to the Roku), it comes out choppy with no sound.

Is the problem my PC, or is it that my 54Mbs network is still not fast enough to playback High-Definition MPeg? More importantly, are their solutions? Is anyone able to playback high-definiton over a wireless network?
 
jimre

Mon Sep 12, 2005 10:31 pm

I think you'd be *extremely* lucky to be able to play HD video over wireless. You're aware that the theoretical maximum ACTUAL data thoughput of 54Mbit/sec 802.11g is about half, say 27Mbit/sec? And that's under absolutely ideal, perfect conditions - like within a couple feet with absolutely zero interference. In the real world, I doubt you'd even get close to 20Mbit/sec.

And that's the problem - standard broadcast HDTV is 19.2Mbit/sec. Video from an HDV camera like the Sony can be up to 25Mbit/sec.

The solution? Bite the bullet & run an ethernet cable if you want to watch HD.
 
Steve Criz
Posts: 46
Joined: Wed Jan 12, 2005 1:34 am
Location: Katoomba

Tue Sep 13, 2005 5:05 am

jimre wrote:
I think you'd be *extremely* lucky to be able to play HD video over wireless. You're aware that the theoretical maximum ACTUAL data thoughput of 54Mbit/sec 802.11g is about half, say 27Mbit/sec? And that's under absolutely ideal, perfect conditions - like within a couple feet with absolutely zero interference. In the real world, I doubt you'd even get close to 20Mbit/sec.

And that's the problem - standard broadcast HDTV is 19.2Mbit/sec. Video from an HDV camera like the Sony can be up to 25Mbit/sec.

The solution? Bite the bullet & run an ethernet cable if you want to watch HD.


Do as suggested. I have a Sony FX-1e and a JVC HD-10u.

NTSC clips from the 720p 19.3Mbit JVC work perfectly across a wired network. NTSC 1080i 25Mbit Sony clips also work (just make sure you've set up a reasonable size swap on your CF card) across wired network - generally...

At this point, I've not got any PAL clips from the FX-1e to work, so if you have the PAL version as I do... you're just gonna have to wait.
 
dgburns
Posts: 807
Joined: Mon Jun 27, 2005 9:37 am

Thu Sep 15, 2005 6:01 am

Roku state a wired ethernet connection is "required" for HD video playback. Some people have got wireless to work, but I think that's more an exception than the norm. As stated, the ethernet connection needs to be able to support SUSTAINED throughput of 20+ megabits/sec, which few wireless setups can achieve.
HD-1500 RevB #1 (media room)
Mitsubishi WD-62528 62" LCD RPTV
Kenwood VR-407 receiver w/PSB Alpha's
PS/3 60GB (now 250GB) w/750GB Seagate ext
M1000 (upstairs)
HD-1000 RevB #2 (bedroom)
Visco 32" LCD
AR 2.1 audio system
PS/2
 
jono
Posts: 5
Joined: Sat Feb 19, 2005 3:54 pm

Tue Sep 20, 2005 11:45 am

Steve Criz wrote:
NTSC clips from the 720p 19.3Mbit JVC work perfectly across a wired network. NTSC 1080i 25Mbit Sony clips also work (just make sure you've set up a reasonable size swap on your CF card) across wired network - generally...


For streaming 25Mbit/s Sony clips, can you be more specific about the requirements for the CF card (size and speed)? Also, is there specific consumer software you can recommend to capture these clips? Finally, I have seen elsewhere in these forums a suggestion to move from SMB to NFS to handle 25Mbit/sec. Your message suggests that this may not be necessary. Could you please confirm? Thanks
 
Augeas
Posts: 15
Joined: Sat Sep 04, 2004 8:40 pm

Belkin pre-n

Fri Oct 07, 2005 5:02 pm

I have tried various solutions to get reliable video transfered to my Roku over wireless. I ended up with a Belkin pre-n solution... I get spotty results transfering HD, it seems to depend on the amount of interference I get from my neighbors. DVD's on the other hand are terrific all the time, the only time I get glitches since MPlay v3 is when the microwave is used. Pre-n is the way to go for high bandwidth transfers unless you are willing to wait for the official N standard (maybe 2006) which is supposed to transfer at 300M or more using the same antenna technology as the pre-N routers.

The actual throughput of my pre-N network is 4 to 7 times greater than any G or super-g network I have tried.

Tony
 
crappyguy
Posts: 21
Joined: Thu Dec 23, 2004 1:57 pm

Re: Belkin pre-n

Sat Oct 08, 2005 11:26 am

flower I can't even get DVDs to play back using my wireless G router less alone HD. If I'm lucky I get about a minute before everything starts to get choppy.




Stupid wireless.
 
xwing
Posts: 9
Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2005 8:11 am

Thu Oct 13, 2005 4:33 am

Augeas: thanks for the info on streaming video thru wireless. I am considering getting the PB mainly to stream videos but I need to ensure I have a network that is fast enough. I have looked at powerline and phoneline networks; they are not good enough. CAT5 is not an option for me. Thus I am considering the pre-n approach as that seems to provide the fastest transfer rates today. What kind of bridge or adapter did you connect to the Roku PB for receiving the wireless signal? I do not see any pre-n bridges in the market. Thanks again.
 
Steve Criz
Posts: 46
Joined: Wed Jan 12, 2005 1:34 am
Location: Katoomba

Fri Oct 14, 2005 6:12 pm

jono wrote:
For streaming 25Mbit/s Sony clips, can you be more specific about the requirements for the CF card (size and speed)? Also, is there specific consumer software you can recommend to capture these clips? Finally, I have seen elsewhere in these forums a suggestion to move from SMB to NFS to handle 25Mbit/sec. Your message suggests that this may not be necessary. Could you please confirm? Thanks


Sorry about not replying earlier... I've just not had much time for a device that in a few months time may well be used as a door stop!!

OK. For NTSC HD/HDV the Roku works 'sorta fine'... don't try too many 'shuffles' or pauses or any interruption while the file is playing back. Never ever think that wireless will handle HD/HDV.

I probably have my network set using SMB - don't know, and given some of the other advice I've received regarding getting HD/HDV PAL material to work... I couldn't be bothered blowing even more time to possibly solve a single problem with a method that'll ultimately create thousands. To be honest: if I have to start mucking around at that level to achieve what should be capable, regardless of SMB/NFS, the device ain't worth it...

The CF card I'm running is 2Gig, with a 640Mb swap.

If you are asking "what software will capture HDV from a HDV camcorder"? then the answer is: AspectHD or ConnectHD from Cineform, VLC, CapDHVS...

If on the other hand you are asking how do I get HD/HDV files into my computer (without having a HDV camcorder)? Well; there's plenty of m2t files available if you look hard enough on the net. Anything less than the raw m2t will give you the false sense of security that decent playback of a downconverted, bit-rate knobbled, heavily doctored file can bring.
 
dj7675
Posts: 298
Joined: Mon Jan 17, 2005 6:48 pm

Re: Belkin pre-n

Wed Nov 16, 2005 3:12 pm

Augeas wrote:
I have tried various solutions to get reliable video transfered to my Roku over wireless. I ended up with a Belkin pre-n solution... I get spotty results transfering HD, it seems to depend on the amount of interference I get from my neighbors. DVD's on the other hand are terrific all the time, the only time I get glitches since MPlay v3 is when the microwave is used. Pre-n is the way to go for high bandwidth transfers unless you are willing to wait for the official N standard (maybe 2006) which is supposed to transfer at 300M or more using the same antenna technology as the pre-N routers.

The actual throughput of my pre-N network is 4 to 7 times greater than any G or super-g network I have tried.

Tony


I am getting this router as well because from user reports gets very good coverage. However I see from test results the pre-n seems to get about 35 Mb/s from their matching belkin pre-n gear. My HD files I stream all have the null packets removed so actually end up around 13-15 Mb/s. If I used a second Belken Pre-n router as an access point and hooked it up directly to the roku via a wired connection do you think that would work? The two routers would only be about 20 feet apart but I just can't get a wire to this one area where the Roku resides. Also on your tests to try to stream HD to the Roku, how do you have it set up?

Any input would be greatly appreciated.

Darin
 
jor
Posts: 204
Joined: Sat Dec 25, 2004 7:51 pm

Wed Nov 16, 2005 4:33 pm

transfer rate might be a bit bursty still. On a machine that can do a lot of buffering (iow, a PC), might tolerate that well, but in the case of an embedded device like the roku you could see what Tony did.

Don't buy anything you can't return on this experiment.

On a different note, is ethernet over AC remotely viable yet?
 
dgburns
Posts: 807
Joined: Mon Jun 27, 2005 9:37 am

Tue Nov 22, 2005 10:26 am

jor wrote:
On a different note, is ethernet over AC remotely viable yet?


xwing mentioned powerline above, saying "they are not good enough" but nothing about WHY not.
HD-1500 RevB #1 (media room)

Mitsubishi WD-62528 62" LCD RPTV

Kenwood VR-407 receiver w/PSB Alpha's

PS/3 60GB (now 250GB) w/750GB Seagate ext

M1000 (upstairs)

HD-1000 RevB #2 (bedroom)

Visco 32" LCD

AR 2.1 audio system

PS/2
 
xwing
Posts: 9
Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2005 8:11 am

Video over powerline

Wed Nov 30, 2005 4:07 pm

Sorry about not responding sooner... Powerline products available today have a best case speed of about 11 Mbps and more typically around 4 to 6 Mpbs. This is not enough for streaming video smoothly. However, Netgear has announced a 84 Mbps powerline bridge/switch unit (XE104). This product should be available on the market soon and I am hoping that it will solve my problems. For now, I have installed cat5 over as much of my house as is viable.

BTW, I tried the pre-n routers from Belkin and Netgear with their matching cards. They didn't work reliably for me (choppy video/audio) even over a distance of 20 feet. I had wep on though (turning wep off seems risky) which reduces speed.
 
dj7675
Posts: 298
Joined: Mon Jan 17, 2005 6:48 pm

Thu Dec 01, 2005 9:54 am

Thanks for the info on the pre-n router. I was thinking about getting a second one and trying it, but I will skip this option and work on getting a wire to my location or waiting for for the new netgear product. Now that I have slimroku working and showed it to my wife she wants another photobridge and use it for music.--Darin
 
xwing
Posts: 9
Joined: Sat Oct 01, 2005 8:11 am

Thu Dec 01, 2005 11:15 am

Regarding powerline options I should add that corinex has a product that they claim runs at 200 mbps. However, it is pricey and not based on the homeplug standard. I have not tried this option. If anyone has any experience with these please post. Thanks.

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