Your Digital Media Has Never Looked So Good

 
yanny
Topic Author
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Joined: Mon Mar 19, 2012 3:17 pm

How to connect new Roku 2 or 3 to TV or monitor without HDMI

Fri Sep 18, 2015 1:56 pm

Is there a way to connect the new Roku 2 or 3 to a TV or monitor that does not have an HDMI port, and get video and audio? The TV and monitor have VGA, DVI-D, component, composite (red and white audio, yellow video) and S-video inputs. The new Roku 2 and 3 only have HDMI out.

I connect an older Roku XDS to the TV or monitor with an HDMI-to-DVI-D cable for video, and the red and white connections for audio. I can also connect it with a component cable plus the red and white connections, or the composite cable. But the Roku XDS frequently buffers/re-loads, especially when other devices are streaming. The Roku 2 and 3 are supposedly much faster so I hope they will have better internet connectivity. But I do not see how to get audio from the Roku 2 and 3 to the TV or monitor, since they only have HDMI out.

I considered the alternative of the new Roku 1 which has composite ports in addition to HDMI. But it is slower than Roku 2 and 3, does not have component (better video) or ethernet ports, or dual-band wireless, which are desirable.
 
Billy T Kidd
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Re: How to connect new Roku 2 or 3 to TV or monitor without

Fri Sep 18, 2015 2:13 pm

Here's the easiest and cheapest ($29.99) way to get it done.I own one and it works Very well.Good color Good PQ and correct black level. :D
Only drawback is that it can only give you standard def.Not HD.
.http://www.amazon.com/HDMI-3RCA-Composi ... +converter
Last edited by Billy T Kidd on Fri Sep 18, 2015 2:26 pm, edited 1 time in total.
 
yanny
Topic Author
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Joined: Mon Mar 19, 2012 3:17 pm

Re: How to connect new Roku 2 or 3 to TV or monitor without

Fri Sep 18, 2015 2:25 pm

Thanks. When you use this HDMI to composite (standard definition) converter is your internet connection on the Roku stable and fast?

I am asking because my reason for upgrading from the older XDS to the new Roku 2 is to reduce the buffering/re-loading problems of the XDS, especially when watching Netflix, when others in the house are streaming on other devices.
 
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kc8pql
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Re: How to connect new Roku 2 or 3 to TV or monitor without

Fri Sep 18, 2015 2:26 pm

yanny wrote:
The Roku 2 and 3 are supposedly much faster so I hope they will have better internet connectivity.
...especially when watching Netflix, when others in the house are streaming on other devices.

A faster processor won't help a slow or unstable internet connection.
Last edited by kc8pql on Fri Sep 18, 2015 2:30 pm, edited 1 time in total.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________
No, I don't work for Roku.
Netflix Player N1000X, XDS 2100X (premature death by lightning)
Roku2 XD 3050X, Roku2 XS 3100R, Roku2 4210R
 
Billy T Kidd
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Joined: Fri Jul 24, 2015 8:11 am

Re: How to connect new Roku 2 or 3 to TV or monitor without

Fri Sep 18, 2015 2:29 pm

My internet connection is only 8Mbts down,but it is steady,and can stream anything i want too w/o problems.HD streaming is no problem.
BTW,i own a Roku 2XS.
 
Schmye Bubbula
Posts: 578
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Re: How to connect new Roku 2 or 3 to TV or monitor without

Fri Sep 18, 2015 3:29 pm

Billy T Kidd, why do you use that Bleiden HDMI-to-Composite converter on your Roku 2 XS, when it already has Composite output?

I learned the hard way that the current Roku 2 & 3 will display a horizontally cropped & vertically distorted picture on an old 4:3 TV because these Rokus are HDMI-only, with no Composite output, and thus no longer offer in Settings a Display Type of "4:3 Standard," which is the only reason you don't get the butchered picture with your earlier model Roku 2 XS.
– –
Roku 3 (4200) purchased for $22.93 on clearance at Office Depot > Bleiden HDMI-to-Composite converter > old 4:3 CRT TV (now in another room, as I have acquired a modern LCD flat screen TV, March 2017)

R.I.P. Roku XD|S (2100), Feb 2011–Apr 2016
 
Billy T Kidd
Posts: 94
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Re: How to connect new Roku 2 or 3 to TV or monitor without

Fri Sep 18, 2015 3:44 pm

have tried it on my 2XS,and it works flawlessly,but i connected it to an older 16x9 LCD HDTV,not an old 4x3 TV.

I think the Stick converter is meant to be used on older non-HDMI widescreen LCD/Plasma tv's,not old 4x3's.The Roku Stick converter outputs whatever AR is input.But if you're trying to get a "normal" pic.out of an old 4x3 TV,especially a widescreen image,you're probably SOL.
There might be some work-around but i wouldn't want to be the one futzing around trying to do it. :shock:
Last edited by Billy T Kidd on Thu Oct 01, 2015 10:51 am, edited 4 times in total.
 
MWDXER
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Re: How to connect new Roku 2 or 3 to TV or monitor without

Sat Sep 19, 2015 1:46 am

Would something like this work using any streaming device like a Chromecast?
 
Schmye Bubbula
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Re: How to connect new Roku 2 or 3 to TV or monitor without

Sat Sep 19, 2015 1:54 am

^ *All* of the various HDMI-to-Composite converters will simply faithfully pass-through the Chromecast's or any other streaming device's 16:9 screen aspect ratio. Consequently, if your target is an old 4:3 TV display, you will see a butchered, horizontally-cropped, vertically-stretched picture from the current Roku 2 & 3 models, which lack a Display Type of "4:3 Standard" in Settings.
– –
Roku 3 (4200) purchased for $22.93 on clearance at Office Depot > Bleiden HDMI-to-Composite converter > old 4:3 CRT TV (now in another room, as I have acquired a modern LCD flat screen TV, March 2017)

R.I.P. Roku XD|S (2100), Feb 2011–Apr 2016
 
scottd34
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Re: How to connect new Roku 2 or 3 to TV or monitor without

Sat Sep 19, 2015 4:44 am

8mbps is not going to support too many streaming devices, netflix has their bandwidth requirements here https://help.netflix.com/en/node/306

You would be better off changing the quality int he netflix account settings first to see if that helps multiple devices stream better. Remember you need to leave 20% of your bandwidth available for overhead so you have around 6.5 mbps to work with assuming only the rokus are streaming.

You would do better getting a faster internet package to reduce buffering when multiple rokus are streaming, if that roku streams fine when it is the only thing using the network then it isnt the roku box thats having problems and you need to start looking at the network itself.
 
Billy T Kidd
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Re: How to connect new Roku 2 or 3 to TV or monitor without

Sat Sep 19, 2015 6:09 am

scottd34 wrote:
8mbps is not going to support too many streaming devices, netflix has their bandwidth requirements here https://help.netflix.com/en/node/306

You would be better off changing the quality int he netflix account settings first to see if that helps multiple devices stream better. Remember you need to leave 20% of your bandwidth available for overhead so you have around 6.5 mbps to work with assuming only the rokus are streaming.

You would do better getting a faster internet package to reduce buffering when multiple rokus are streaming, if that roku streams fine when it is the only thing using the network then it isnt the roku box thats having problems and you need to start looking at the network itself.

8Mbts is more than enough to stream anything i want too.I Never have a problem streaming anything from NF at its highest setting,or from Vudu,amazon,or any other service you can name.No buffering problems ever.
I'm not one of those people that needs a tv in every room with multiple Roku's connected to each tv.I have 1 tv and 1 Roku,that's all i need.

8Mbts is fast enough for me to stream a 1080p movie thru my Roku,plus stream another movie on my laptop at the same time...i know this is possible because i've tried it to see if i could,and it works w/o problems.I don't need 80Mbts...or 150Mbts,or whatever,that's just overkill, plus i'd be paying more for extra speed that i don't need.So if i don't Need the extra bandwidth,why pay for it?? :roll:
I don't need a faster connection,my Roku AND laptop both work well at the same time with what i've got.No problems here. :)
 
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kc8pql
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Re: How to connect new Roku 2 or 3 to TV or monitor without

Sat Sep 19, 2015 7:28 am

Billy T Kidd wrote:
8Mbts is fast enough for me to stream a 1080p movie thru my Roku,plus stream another movie on my laptop at the same time...i know this is possible because i've tried it to see if i could,and it works w/o problems.I don't need 80Mbts...or 150Mbts,or whatever,that's just overkill, plus i'd be paying more for extra speed that i don't need.So if i don't Need the extra bandwidth,why pay for it?? :roll:
I don't need a faster connection,my Roku AND laptop both work well at the same time with what i've got.No problems here. :)


You may have no problems, but the OP says does, and it's unlikely replacing his Roku with another model is going to help.
His symptoms point to insufficient bandwidth to do that he wants to do.
____________________________________________________________________________________________________________
No, I don't work for Roku.
Netflix Player N1000X, XDS 2100X (premature death by lightning)
Roku2 XD 3050X, Roku2 XS 3100R, Roku2 4210R
 
Billy T Kidd
Posts: 94
Joined: Fri Jul 24, 2015 8:11 am

Re: How to connect new Roku 2 or 3 to TV or monitor without

Sat Sep 19, 2015 10:10 am

Hmmm...went over the OP's posts but he never mentions his speed,only that he's having buffering problems,which probably is caused by a slow down speed.
I'm the one who mentioned my speed as being @8Mbts.,so i naturally assumed Scottd34 was referring to that post (5th.post from the top).

Not arguing...just sayin. :)
 
Schmye Bubbula
Posts: 578
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Re: How to connect new Roku 2 or 3 to TV or monitor without

Sat Sep 19, 2015 10:47 am

I ruled-out a very convoluted connection for trying to get an HDMI-only current Roku 2 or 3 through an HDMI-to-Composite converter displaying a proper aspect ratio on a 4:3 TV:

Roku 2 4210 > HDMI-to-Composite converter > DVD player set to 4:3 Letterbox, composite-out > old 4:3 TV

...but turned-out that the DVD player's aspect ratio setting only is applicable to its HDMI output; that video setting is moot when a composite connection is made to the TV.

- -
(I couldn't even get the DVD player's aspect ratio setting's change to occur to the TV picture when tested with:

TiVo, composite-out > DVD player, HDMI-out > HDMI-to-Composite converter > old 4:3 TV

...Whenever I changed the DVD player's aspect ratio setting, my Bleiden HDMI-to-Composite converter duly displayed on the TV a momentary test pattern with the correct resolution listed during the switchover, but the observed picture geometry never actually changed, no matter whether I was watching TiVo playback, TiVo tuner live TV, or DVD playback. What's up with that? Why doesn't the screen geometry change like you can see it do when, for example, you change an old Roku's Display Type setting from "4:3 Standard" to "16:9 Anamorphoc" or to "HDTV 720p"?)

Edit: I found elsewhere the answer to my immediately preceding, somewhat off-topic digression:

You aren't doing anything wrong: a DVD player on its own cannot fix your framing issue. The problem lies with the Roku: it is sending a raw anamorphic-squeezed signal thru HDMI and your converter. This raw signal lacks the necessary flag that tells the DVD unit the signal is anamorphic, so the DVD unit simply assumes it is standard 4:3 and displays it incorrectly no matter how you change the display settings. This is not a big deal with modern 16:9 TVs that have a simple remote button to fix it, but theres nothing simple you can do to make it look right on an older 4:3 TV.

The anamorphic squeeze and widescreen "flag" business is a tricky thing. Not every widescreen source carries a flag, not every connected device reads it or implements it, not all TVs automatically reframe the incoming signal based on it. Its a bit of a mess. DVD recorders themselves, by and large, don't even bother to add the widescreen flag when they record their own DVDs: one of the giant honking asinine design screwups that pretty much killed them as a popular consumer product.

The reason you aren't seeing any framing effect when you change the dvd player display settings is that most players will not apply those changes to external inputs: those settings will only take effect when playing a DVD or the internal widescreen tuner (if the player has one). Also these settings are rather dependent on the presence of a correct aspect ratio flag: if the DVD or broadcast doesn't have a flag, the display system defaults to 4:3 which will be totally wrong if the signal is actually anamorphic, esp on a 4:3 TV that lacks corrective picture stretch controls.

This whole trainwreck started back when the DVD format was introduced in 1997, with the 4:3 frame as standard "container" for any other picture framings. The 4:3 "container" held one of three possible signals: true 4:3 (like old movies and TV shows), hard letterboxed widescreen (black bars top and bottom in a 4:3 frame), or true widescreen (anamorphically squeezed into a full 4:3 frame, requiring a stretch to display properly on a 16:9 TV). The first two work automatically on just about any hardware or display, showing proper proportions on any TV.

The third one, anamorphic, is a hopeless mess unless a flag is added that identifies itself to a playback device that honors it. Hollywood DVDs, and DVDs made on a PC, normally contain this flag. When a DVD player senses the flag, it will coordinate the framing output based on your display setting: if you set it to 16:9 display, it will stretch the video to fill a widescreen. If you set it to 4:3 display, it will stretch out the frame and then shrink it with black letterbox bars to fit properly on a 4:3 tv. If set to 4:3 Pan And Scan, it will crop the sides and fill a 4:3 tv with the center of the 16:9 frame (no black bars).

When a DVD or input signal has no flag, everything defaults to 4:3. This is easily fixed with the framing controls of a widescreen TV, but wreaks havoc with a 4:3 tv. As you've seen, the TV will show the raw squeezed anamorphic frame. This distortion is often surprisingly tolerable if the signal is truly 16:9, because it at least fills the 4:3 screen even if the verticals are squeezed.

But it becomes unwatchable if the source video was originally 4:3 re-processed as anamorphic: in that case, you get the hideously squeezed 4:3 picture in the middle of your 4:3 screen with redundant black bars on the left and right sides. This is the signal you are getting from the Roku, and that many of us get from cable/satellite boxes: many services now process 4:3 and 16:9 alike as anamorphic, when 4:3 really was intended to be left alone.

Not to beat a dead horse, but the world has turned on a dime and largely abandoned 4:3 televisions. Making signals compatible with both 4:3 and 16:9 televisions is not a priority for streaming services, cable, or satellite. They have all settled on HDMI as the primary connection, and HDMI was intended for 16:9 displays. These services now assume everyone has a 16:9 television, with the button that fixes any stray framing issues, so they just process all content as anamorphic without bothering to keep 4:3 material in its original 4:3 form. If you have a 4:3 television, you're out of luck with these services.
– –
Roku 3 (4200) purchased for $22.93 on clearance at Office Depot > Bleiden HDMI-to-Composite converter > old 4:3 CRT TV (now in another room, as I have acquired a modern LCD flat screen TV, March 2017)

R.I.P. Roku XD|S (2100), Feb 2011–Apr 2016
 
Schmye Bubbula
Posts: 578
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Re: How to connect new Roku 2 or 3 to TV or monitor without

Wed Sep 23, 2015 10:47 am

I've further (probably) ruled-out yet another workaround for playing an HDMI-only Roku 2 through an old 4:3 TV: connection through an AVR (audio/video receiver) possessing aspect ratio control. I was contemplating maybe finding one on eBay that's broken — for example, with the audio amplifier damaged but the A/V preamp section still working — for perhaps $30. I've never used an AVR before and know nothing about them, so I asked around and was warned that at least most of them will disable their composite outputs whenever an HDMI input is connected (because of the nazi Hollywood content providers). Aaarrgghh! I just can't win! So unless I could find an AVR that doesn't artificially cripple itself like that, then that's out.

That leaves only the final possibility of a revelation of some secret menu or remote control key sequence that would activate any Display Type setting of "4:3 Standard" lingering unused in the Roku 2's firmware left-over from last year's model, which would make it work properly with an HDMI-to-Composite converter, but I'm not getting my hopes up.
– –
Roku 3 (4200) purchased for $22.93 on clearance at Office Depot > Bleiden HDMI-to-Composite converter > old 4:3 CRT TV (now in another room, as I have acquired a modern LCD flat screen TV, March 2017)

R.I.P. Roku XD|S (2100), Feb 2011–Apr 2016

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